September 27, 2017

Sarawakian Local Delights : Chicken and Terong Soup

This is a favourite dish cooked by the Ibans in the longhouses. It can be an every day dish or a festive dish.

The Terong Dayak or golden brinjal is easily grown on well drained and sunny hill slopes. It is grown when the farmers start to sow their fields And in no time the sides of the farms would have a large number of terong plants. It is strange that it can even be grown in untended gardens if birds drop the seeds. Sometimes one can find a terong tree on the bank of a river with lots of fruits but in a well tended garden, the few terong plants,purposefully planted would not give out any fruits.

The terong Dayak is unique because it is sour,unlike the other kinds of brinjals. The skin starts to wrinkle up after it is plucked but then it can retain its freshness for up to even two or three weeks without refrigeration. It is really a very hardy vegetable.



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Solanum Lasiocarpum (Scientific name) Terong Dayak or Terong Asam



It is green when young and it turns a beautiful orange yellow when ripe. Sometimes different colouration may appear like purple, black or red streaks. This is again another unique feature of this brinjal. When it is ripe, the small hair on the skin will be completely gone.

The seeds are very small. Most people would not even discard the seeds during cooking.

the fruit can be sliced or cut into wedges. As a result some people even call it the Dayak Tomato!!

It is now rather pricey as it is being exported to Singapore and West Malaysia from Sarawak.

It enhances chicken soup, Fish Head Curry, Assam Fish Soup. Actually it goes well with all sorts of meat and fish. However it can be cooked on its own and would make a very good first course as it would really increase one's appetite.

God works in miraculous ways. This is God's gift to Sarawak.






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